Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

Completed or Finished Options · View
rolandlytle
Posted: Monday, March 7, 2016 7:33:21 AM

Rank: Forum Guru
Moderator

Joined: 1/14/2013
Posts: 1,699
Location: Chicago area, United States
"Complete" or "Finished"?


I have often had difficulty defining the difference between complete and finished. I mother sent me a little E-mail quip.


During a recent linguistic conference, held in London the question was asked to make that very distinction. The question from audience was this: "Some say there is no difference between 'complete' and 'finished.' Please explain the difference in a way that is easy to understand."

The response: "When you marry the right woman, you are 'complete.' If you marry the wrong woman, you are 'finished.' And, if the right one catches you with the wrong one, you are 'completely finished.'"

His answer received a five minute standing ovation.


Thought you might all enjoy this.

You can't get there from here, because when you get there you're still here and here is now there.
akatsuki_dragon
Posted: Monday, March 7, 2016 9:53:52 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 11/10/2013
Posts: 180
Location: Sinning
I got to say that is pretty damn funny and very educational!!!

Quote:
Her courage was her crown and she wore it like a queen -Atticus
DannyX
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:34:19 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 9/10/2017
Posts: 24
Location: Liverpool, United Kingdom
I would say completed relates to a task where there is a quantifiable goal. Finished is more about an end point of a process or activity.

For example: I completed the test in 12 minutes.

Jake's firm completed the building in under a year.


Compare with the below examples:

I've finished the book that I was working on.

Laura finished her dinner and went out to play.


D x
Rumple_deWriter
Posted: Thursday, September 21, 2017 10:15:58 AM

Rank: Story Moderator
Moderator

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 500
Location: lost in the ozone west of Apache Junction
DX, many thanks for that clear, concise, not to mention, cogent post. For me, it really was a helpful response.

glasses8

Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwords.[/ - ROBERT HEINLEIN

Schemers Scheme -- young women talking about young men

OF WAR, AND PEACE, AND MARY BETH: my contest winner, honest

For Whom the Good Tolls an 'RR' and it's short, no kidding

DannyX
Posted: Thursday, September 21, 2017 2:22:43 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 9/10/2017
Posts: 24
Location: Liverpool, United Kingdom
Rumple_deWriter wrote:
DX, many thanks for that clear, concise, not to mention, cogent post. For me, it really was a helpful response.



Ah, thank you! Always happy to help icon_smile

D x
Rumple_deWriter
Posted: Monday, October 9, 2017 10:58:54 AM

Rank: Story Moderator
Moderator

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 500
Location: lost in the ozone west of Apache Junction
Picking up on DX's 'finished v completed' post, here are a couple more combos that can confuse some writers.

Further v farther
principle v principal

Anybody want to take a shot?

glasses8

Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwords.[/ - ROBERT HEINLEIN

Schemers Scheme -- young women talking about young men

OF WAR, AND PEACE, AND MARY BETH: my contest winner, honest

For Whom the Good Tolls an 'RR' and it's short, no kidding

DannyX
Posted: Sunday, October 15, 2017 2:51:47 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 9/10/2017
Posts: 24
Location: Liverpool, United Kingdom
Rumple_deWriter wrote:
Picking up on DX's 'finished v completed' post, here are a couple more combos that can confuse some writers.

Further v farther
principle v principal

Anybody want to take a shot?

glasses8


Farther v further is interesting.

I find farther is underused as it's probably either misunderstood or is considered to be high register and people use the more 'common' further instead. It feels safe and in almost all uses further is correct.

Strictly speaking, farther relates to distance, as in 'I now have farther to walk, since I moved jobs.' Further relates to concepts, as is 'I would like to take your argument further and see how it can be applied in other contexts.'

As a moderator on another site read2 I can't remember the last time I saw the word farther. As far as I know and from my memory of looking at this in uni, the words are interchangeable.

The graph below shows how the relative frequencies of the two words have changed historically.



Farther may also be underused owing to it being homophonous with father and this jangles in people's heads?

I would need to do some research to say a lot more about this.


Principle v principal is a different barrel of fish. These are just words with different meanings that people confuse. I suppose they have the same Latin root.

I have a little mnemonic for remembering the difference. 'I began with first principles, but principally the Principal was my pal.'

Danny x


Survivor
Posted: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 2:41:00 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 12/21/2012
Posts: 3,603
Location: bajo un árbol de álamo
My simple mnemonic for further and farther is to remember farther is "far" and further is "furthermore", or also. So, far and more.



All I'm saying is you've never seen me crying and eating tacos at the same time.
philliptennyson
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 2:16:52 AM

Rank: Rookie Scribe

Joined: 1/3/2019
Posts: 5
Location: Boston
It's a pretty funny explanation. I need to remember it to define if some work is finished or complete.
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.