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elizabethblack
Posted: Saturday, May 23, 2020 6:44:33 PM
elizabethblack
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Joined: 1/12/2014
Posts: 1,735
"The Betrayed Wife" by Kevin O'Brien
Just started it. have a bunch of girlfriends that pass books back and forth.



Tiger
Posted: Sunday, May 24, 2020 11:50:29 AM
Tiger
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Joined: 8/4/2016
Posts: 471
"The Redhead by the Side of the Road," by Anne Tyler.
It was a lot of fun to read. I highly recommend it.
gillianleeza
Posted: Tuesday, October 13, 2020 1:26:22 AM
gillianleeza
Rank: Story Moderator
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Joined: 11/25/2015
Posts: 1,051
Location: Sailing on the Bay, United States
The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

An interesting book so far. I'm not usually a fan of time travel but this has a different feel. The descriptions of the time period the character ends up in are very detailed. The research the author did before writing it was very thorough. I still have no idea how it will end. That's a good thing.



Some of my stuff.
https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/memoirs/learning-to-fly.aspx
https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/memoirs/misery-loves-company.aspx
https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/poetry/we-always-go-on.aspx
https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/poetry/heart-flutters.aspx
AnnaMayZing
Posted: Tuesday, October 13, 2020 12:39:22 PM
AnnaMayZing
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Joined: 9/1/2015
Posts: 7,925
Dresden. The Fire and the Darkness. by Sinclair McKay.

It is the story of Dresden in Eastern Germany. McKay beautifully describes the city and its life leading up to the nights of almost total destruction in February 1945 and then goes on to recount its rise from the ashes under soviet occupation. He then continues from 1990 to the present when Dresden breathes again. A very fascinating story.



The third part of this epic journey starts here... https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/the-long-road-home-chapter-1.aspx

If anyone wishes to find the beginning of this epic saga, here it is:

https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/-the-nurses-.aspx

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." George Santayana
Mendalla
Posted: Tuesday, October 13, 2020 1:09:35 PM
Mendalla
Rank: Forum Facilitator

Joined: 4/23/2014
Posts: 1,256
Location: Somewhere amongst the trees
gillianleeza wrote:
The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

An interesting book so far. I'm not usually a fan of time travel but this has a different feel. The descriptions of the time period the character ends up in are very detailed. The research the author did before writing it was very thorough. I still have no idea how it will end. That's a good thing.


I used to love her stories (including some in the same milieu as The Doomsday Book IIRC) back when I was reading Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine (normally shortened to IASFM for obvious reasons) but haven't read much recently. Terrific author.

I have reading, in slow dribs and drabs, Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife by theologian Bart Ehrman. Looks at how the ideas we have of Heaven and Hell in the Western Christian world evolved from earlier ones in Greek and Hebrew thought. Not for Biblical literalists since it take an historical-cultural approach to the Bible that assumes it is a human creation.


The Goddess Dances - Winner - Cheers to 10 Years Flash

The Berry Girl - Third place - Summer Word Bank
Molly
Posted: Tuesday, October 13, 2020 4:24:57 PM
Molly
Rank: Administration
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Joined: 10/30/2013
Posts: 940
I've just started this one. I'm looking forward to it.
Tiger
Posted: Sunday, November 1, 2020 2:15:39 AM
Tiger
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Joined: 8/4/2016
Posts: 471
I am currently caught up in the writings of Fredrik Backman. I've read "Ouve" and "My Grandmother says she's Sorry." They are easy reads, with lots of imagination , and plenty of endearing characters. You will laugh often and get teary about once a book. I will start a third book today, "Beartown."
Mendalla
Posted: Sunday, November 1, 2020 5:16:45 AM
Mendalla
Rank: Forum Facilitator

Joined: 4/23/2014
Posts: 1,256
Location: Somewhere amongst the trees
My reading drought continues. Have not been able to hold interest in an actual novel or longform non-fiction for a while. So I have mostly been reading comp entries here of late.

The Goddess Dances - Winner - Cheers to 10 Years Flash

The Berry Girl - Third place - Summer Word Bank
gypsy
Posted: Sunday, November 8, 2020 5:09:55 AM
gypsy
Rank: Forum Facilitator

Joined: 10/13/2010
Posts: 1,970
I'm re-reading The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnet and enjoying every word of it. It is just the right story at the moment, for me, at least.



The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. Junius



AnnaMayZing
Posted: Sunday, November 8, 2020 10:30:13 AM
AnnaMayZing
Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/1/2015
Posts: 7,925
gypsy wrote:
I'm re-reading The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnet and enjoying every word of it. It is just the right story at the moment, for me, at least.


I saw the new film of the Secret Garden when it came out. Not a bad film in its own right but disappointing compared to the book and previous version.

The third part of this epic journey starts here... https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/the-long-road-home-chapter-1.aspx

If anyone wishes to find the beginning of this epic saga, here it is:

https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/-the-nurses-.aspx

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." George Santayana
gypsy
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2020 2:50:03 AM
gypsy
Rank: Forum Facilitator

Joined: 10/13/2010
Posts: 1,970
AnnaMayZing wrote:
gypsy wrote:
I'm re-reading The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnet and enjoying every word of it. It is just the right story at the moment, for me, at least.


I saw the new film of the Secret Garden when it came out. Not a bad film in its own right but disappointing compared to the book and previous version.


I haven't seen any of the films, and was wondering what the new one was like, not that it is likely I'll get a chance to see it soon.

The images I have in my mind are from both reading the book and seeing the illustrations by Charles Robinson - if a film didn't compare well to the book it would be disappointing to me.

My nephew absolutely loved the Harry Potter series but told his mother when the films started coming out he wouldn't go see them. He had his version of the stories in his mind, and didn't want them disturbed. My sister told me he didn't think the film versions could match his version.



The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. Junius



AnnaMayZing
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2020 12:05:38 PM
AnnaMayZing
Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/1/2015
Posts: 7,925
gypsy wrote:


I haven't seen any of the films, and was wondering what the new one was like, not that it is likely I'll get a chance to see it soon.

The images I have in my mind are from both reading the book and seeing the illustrations by Charles Robinson - if a film didn't compare well to the book it would be disappointing to me.

My nephew absolutely loved the Harry Potter series but told his mother when the films started coming out he wouldn't go see them. He had his version of the stories in his mind, and didn't want them disturbed. My sister told me he didn't think the film versions could match his version.


I thought the same about LOTR but was pleasantly surprised that it generally matched my own impressions. What disappointed me greatly was the huge lump cut out between leaving the shire and arriving at Bree.

The third part of this epic journey starts here... https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/the-long-road-home-chapter-1.aspx

If anyone wishes to find the beginning of this epic saga, here it is:

https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/-the-nurses-.aspx

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." George Santayana
gypsy
Posted: Tuesday, November 10, 2020 5:53:48 AM
gypsy
Rank: Forum Facilitator

Joined: 10/13/2010
Posts: 1,970
AnnaMayZing wrote:


I thought the same about LOTR but was pleasantly surprised that it generally matched my own impressions. What disappointed me greatly was the huge lump cut out between leaving the shire and arriving at Bree.


Interesting, do you think it was cut because the film was going to be quite long as it was? Disclaimer, I've neither read LOTR or seen the films. (I fall squarely into the "could not get into the books no matter how many times I tried".)

While I enjoyed reading The Girl With the Pearl Earring, I thought the film was better.

Daphne du Maurier's My Cousin Rachel is a really great read, and the most recent film adaption with Rachel Weisz is wonderful and does well by the book, I think.

Think Hmmm, some things might be going on the re-read and re-watch list, for this new period of lockdown confinement...



The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. Junius



AnnaMayZing
Posted: Tuesday, November 10, 2020 11:33:14 AM
AnnaMayZing
Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/1/2015
Posts: 7,925
gypsy wrote:
AnnaMayZing wrote:


I thought the same about LOTR but was pleasantly surprised that it generally matched my own impressions. What disappointed me greatly was the huge lump cut out between leaving the shire and arriving at Bree.


Interesting, do you think it was cut because the film was going to be quite long as it was? Disclaimer, I've neither read LOTR or seen the films. (I fall squarely into the "could not get into the books no matter how many times I tried".)

While I enjoyed reading The Girl With the Pearl Earring, I thought the film was better.

Daphne du Maurier's My Cousin Rachel is a really great read, and the most recent film adaption with Rachel Weisz is wonderful and does well by the book, I think.

Think Hmmm, some things might be going on the re-read and re-watch list, for this new period of lockdown confinement...


Well, considering that the eventual film was a total of some Ten hours, I imagine that time was possibly the issue. It's a shame because there are some excellent scenes and characters, including my favourites, Tom Bombadil and 'The River Daughter', Goldberry.



The third part of this epic journey starts here... https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/the-long-road-home-chapter-1.aspx

If anyone wishes to find the beginning of this epic saga, here it is:

https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/-the-nurses-.aspx

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." George Santayana
Molly
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2020 5:50:42 PM
Molly
Rank: Administration
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Joined: 10/30/2013
Posts: 940

Mendalla
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2020 7:09:37 PM
Mendalla
Rank: Forum Facilitator

Joined: 4/23/2014
Posts: 1,256
Location: Somewhere amongst the trees
AnnaMayZing wrote:

I thought the same about LOTR but was pleasantly surprised that it generally matched my own impressions. What disappointed me greatly was the huge lump cut out between leaving the shire and arriving at Bree.


I still have not seen it, but I heard from others that the Scouring of the Shire got axed as well. Too bad on both but movies are movies and books are books. Some things that work in one don't in the other and fully adapting some books, like LOTR, really requires a TV series in some cases.

The Goddess Dances - Winner - Cheers to 10 Years Flash

The Berry Girl - Third place - Summer Word Bank
gillianleeza
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2020 10:59:28 PM
gillianleeza
Rank: Story Moderator
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Joined: 11/25/2015
Posts: 1,051
Location: Sailing on the Bay, United States
AnnaMayZing
Posted: Thursday, November 19, 2020 1:59:28 PM
AnnaMayZing
Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/1/2015
Posts: 7,925
Mendalla wrote:


I still have not seen it, but I heard from others that the Scouring of the Shire got axed as well. Too bad on both but movies are movies and books are books. Some things that work in one don't in the other and fully adapting some books, like LOTR, really requires a TV series in some cases.


And others don't. I am thinking of The Hobbit. I feel that Peter Jackson ruined it with over-the-top action CGI and additional scenes. The Hobbit really didn't warrant another 10 hour rendition. director dontknow

The third part of this epic journey starts here... https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/the-long-road-home-chapter-1.aspx

If anyone wishes to find the beginning of this epic saga, here it is:

https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/-the-nurses-.aspx

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." George Santayana
Mendalla
Posted: Thursday, November 19, 2020 5:27:31 PM
Mendalla
Rank: Forum Facilitator

Joined: 4/23/2014
Posts: 1,256
Location: Somewhere amongst the trees
AnnaMayZing wrote:


And others don't. I am thinking of The Hobbit. I feel that Peter Jackson ruined it with over-the-top action CGI and additional scenes. The Hobbit really didn't warrant another 10 hour rendition. director dontknow


The Rankin-Bass animated Hobbit was, on the other hand, very good even if it lost some bits (like Beorn). The Hobbit can be effectively done with a 2 or 3 hour movie. I have no idea what Jackson was thinking other than milking Middle Earth for all it's worth.


The Goddess Dances - Winner - Cheers to 10 Years Flash

The Berry Girl - Third place - Summer Word Bank
AnnaMayZing
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2020 2:45:14 PM
AnnaMayZing
Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/1/2015
Posts: 7,925
Mendalla wrote:
AnnaMayZing wrote:


And others don't. I am thinking of The Hobbit. I feel that Peter Jackson ruined it with over-the-top action CGI and additional scenes. The Hobbit really didn't warrant another 10 hour rendition. director dontknow


The Rankin-Bass animated Hobbit was, on the other hand, very good even if it lost some bits (like Beorn). The Hobbit can be effectively done with a 2 or 3 hour movie. I have no idea what Jackson was thinking other than milking Middle Earth for all it's worth.


I have a 19CD audio book box set of the BBC radio adaptation of LOTR and The Hobbit. It is a wonderful way to relax in the car on a long journey. I highly recommend it.



The third part of this epic journey starts here... https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/the-long-road-home-chapter-1.aspx

If anyone wishes to find the beginning of this epic saga, here it is:

https://www.storiesspace.com/stories/drama/-the-nurses-.aspx

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." George Santayana
DenimAngel
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2020 3:22:50 PM
DenimAngel
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Joined: 8/28/2016
Posts: 1,462
Location: On a tailgate under the stars
I'm on a John Grisham kick as of late.. Finishing up The Chamber and patiently waiting for a copy of his latest book A Time for Mercy
Long wait at the library for it



Mendalla
Posted: Tuesday, December 15, 2020 6:37:43 PM
Mendalla
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Joined: 4/23/2014
Posts: 1,256
Location: Somewhere amongst the trees
The Werewolf of Paris by Guy Endore. While it was written by an American in 1933 (and uses that as part of its framing device), this classic novel is set in France in the mid-late nineteenth century and doesn't do a half bad job of feeling like it belongs to that time. There's definitely some Victor Hugo DNA in it. While the title character definitely places this as a horror novel, much of it is historical melodrama with events like the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 and the Paris Commune playing roles in the story. And, while the werewolf is certainly the focus of the horror, the humans are often as bad or worse. I mean, the werewolf is conceived when a Catholic priest rapes a fourteen-year-old serving girl sent by her mistress to get some holy water. How much lower can you go than that? Interestingly, lust is as powerful a force as violent hunger in this werewolf story, and it is really about humans, werewolf and ordinary alike, being overtaken by their animal nature. Even the scholarly Frenchman whose writings provide the American narrator with his material gives in to uncontrolled, and somewhat violent, lust for the werewolf's mother (while she is pregnant, no less). Not as famous as other seminal horror works like Frankenstein or Dracula (there is only one direct film adaptation and even it changed the story and setting), but it certainly helped establish and popularize some of the tropes of the modern werewolf novel.

Unfortunately, while the novel dates to 1933, Endore died in 1970 so it is still in copyright in countries that are life+70, else I might have some ideas for using it for the literary challenge.

The Goddess Dances - Winner - Cheers to 10 Years Flash

The Berry Girl - Third place - Summer Word Bank
itsxanderkaidyn
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2020 11:37:09 AM
itsxanderkaidyn
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Joined: 10/15/2020
Posts: 121
Location: Jane's lap
I've just discovered The Mysterious Benedict Society and its sequels and prequel.

Somebody: You attract what you fear.
Me: I'm terrified of Jane Lynch.
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